04-07 JUNE 2013 - EARLS COURT EXHIBITION CENTRE Buy tickets online

PINTA DESIGN

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Manuel Díaz Cebrián
Born in Mexico City, Manuel Díaz Cebrián is the former Director of the Mexico Tourism Board in London. Under his leadership, Mexico has been carefully repositioned as a key destination for cultural and luxury tourism in the United Kingdom and Europe. Manuel has created and supported a wide range of cultural and gastronomic events. Manuel Díaz Cebrián now runs his own company dedicated to promoting Mexico's and Latin America's rich and varied cultural life and in particular art, design and food.

Launched in 2012, Pinta Design 2013 will be curated by Manuel Díaz Cebrián and will present the best of contemporary design from Latin America, confirming that Pinta is a unique view into Latin America.

Pinta Design will offer an interactive space to the visitor. Its aim is to open a window into design in Latin America and to bring new insights about its current developments, inspirations and tendencies.

On Thursday 6 June, Pinta Design, will host the conference "Latin American Design: Does it exist?". The talk will be chaired by Damien Whitmore, Director of Public Affairs & Programming of V&A Museum. The panel will include designers and critics from Latin America and the United Kingdom.

Throughout history Latin-American craftsmen and artists have imagined and designed their future. They built houses, designed furniture, created beautiful ceramics and made stunning works of art and craft. What distinguishes their work however and makes it especially Latin American, is these makers' acknowledgement of their continent's rich and complex history, and their relationship to its stunning and myth-filled landscape. The contribution of Latin American design to the world is compelling and far-reaching.

In the case of Mexico, the contemporary design of this vibrant country truly reflects both its history and its land and peoples. Today's artists are mixing old with new and borrowing elements from around the world reflecting Mexico's status as a truly global nation. Examples such as mortar, the "equipal" leather chair, and textiles - particularly the Mexican shawl - all demonstrate this. Add to this, more contemporary pieces such as the Acapulco chair, or contemporary Mexican architecture and you will see the importance of design in everyday life and culture. There is a recognizable feel to Mexican design that combines a strong and very original aesthetic, a truly unique personality and a strong sense of social and cultural awareness.

Pinta Design's aim is to present and promote the art and craft of Latin America. More importantly it celebrates the work of the artists and makers who produce this work and whose creativity continues to inspire and delight.

Damien Whitmore / Director of Public Affairs & Programming V&A
www.vam.ac.uk

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In Mexico over time, craftsmen, architects and designers have created objects and furniture that emerge from a combination of culture and innovation, adapting and transforming formal design attributes with a mixture of culture and modernity. There is a prominent tradition in contemporary Mexican design for what our country stands out due to its distinctive personality and original aesthetics.

To design means to relate with the world; to face space, people and time.
As a designer, I like to closely and curiously observe the contemporary social and environmental context. The use of traditional materials and natural elements, together with the search of cultural heritage are the cornerstone of my design philosophy.

In our country there is a lot of talent in design, highlighting the new generations which have a lot to contribute to the world as well as the richest craftsmanship potential and an extensive network of industrial workshops that has been meeting the needs of architecture, interior and product design.

Ezequiel Farca / Chief creator and CEO Ezequiel Farca Architecture and Design Studio – Mexico
www.ezequielfarca.com

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I am obsessed with the intersection between design, national branding and commercial marketing. Approximately two years ago, I set out to understand the ways in which specific producers of contemporary Brazilian culture capitalized on misappropriations of the favela in order to lure a Western consumer, a process some refer as favelization. This topic remains my main interest.

I am excited about the potential impact digital curation can have on the traditional curatorial processes. Technology can help expose people to information beyond the traditional channels. We use technology today to do what humans have done in analogue throughout history. Today we tweet, post and blog; in the past we shared books and mailed people articles. It is a natural progression – potentially more democratic and exploratory.

Adriana Kertzer / Design entrepreneur – USA- Brazil
www.adrianakertzer.com

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Historically, Mexican design has been characterized as being composed of "cultural pairs", ranging between the traditional and the modern, the handmade and the industrial and finally the aesthetic and the functional.

Today, designers are aware that in the past two decades, objects being designed, including those produced industrially and on a large scale, become luxury objects and therefore inaccessible to ordinary people.

Many designers have contemplated the way to measure the social role of design today. They have come to realize that returning to the basic principle of good design will generate solutions to our everyday problems. Designers are then reflecting on the materials that they use, their production processes and even the symbolic content of their creations. In these processes, many Mexican designers have turned to collaborative practices to push through new forms of production. They either collaborate with other designers, artisans, chefs, architects or other kinds of professionals. These joint visions are enriching the creative process, generating new ideas and products coupled with a fresher vision of the everyday.

Following the Mexican modern movement, designers currently working in Mexico are turning to local labor and traditional materials from different regions of the country for inspiration. Some are doing this out of choice, necessity or convenience. By working together with local artisans and using locally sourced materials, Mexican design can now be more competitive in today's design market. It seems that those collaborative practices which have been used in the past will now play an important role in the future of Mexican Design.

Ana Elena Mallet / Curator specialised in Mexican design – Mexico
twitter.com/madamemallet

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Most of the relevant handmade design coming from Latin America today is rooted in the real principles of sustainability embracing cultural, environmental and social issues in a way that only a Latin could do it: with a great sense of humour and a hopeful vision for a vibrant present.

Marcella Echavarría / Branding and design consultant – Colombia-Peru-Mexico
www.marcellaechavarria.com